Points, lines and polygons – the art of making maps

If you are interested in maps, you might like to check out a major exhibition on at the National Library, Wellington. ‘Unfolding the Map’ explores the history and the future of cartography in New Zealand. Also in Wellington, Victoria University of Wellington and the National Library are partnering  in a series of map-related talks, on how mapping can be applied to the study of people, geography, the weather, and even literary works.

21 April: ‘Mapping Forced Migration; and Humanity on the Move’ with Kate McMillan and Simone Gigliotti

5 May 2016: ‘The Changing Face of Aotearoa’ with Kevin Norton, Senior lecturer physical geography

11 May: ‘The Future of Maps’ with Aaron Jordan, Topography Group Manager at Land Information New Zealand (LINZ)

17 May: ‘How to Find a Storm: Maps of the Weather’ with Professor James Renwick and Erick Brenstrum.

26 May: ‘Telling new stories with old maps’ with Dr Sydney Shep, Wai-te-Ata Press

All talks are at the National Library and you can find more information on their website.


The Globe on Sale for $10!

The Globe is the journal of the Australian and New Zealand Map Society Inc. (ANZMapS). It includes selected papers from the ANZMapS annual conference, contributed articles, reviews and reports. Articles and papers are peer-reviewed.

We are offering a discount for back issues 2010 and earlier. Usually $15 per publication – you can purchase 2010 and earlier issues for $10. You can find listings for earlier issues on our Publications page.  Not a member? When you join ANZMapS you get every issue of the Globe as part of your membership.


Why there are sea monsters lurking in early world maps?

That’s the playful moniker Dory Klein of the Boston Public Library uses for the creatures found in centuries old maps. She’s an education and outreach assistant at the library’s Norman B. Leventhal Map Center.“In the Medieval and Renaissance period in Europe, people didn’t really know what was out there,” Klein says. “So your corpus of knowledge came from folklore and the Bible. And so in that world, monsters could very well be real and they were just part of this supernatural landscape. Background to the popular twitter hastag #MapMonsterMonday –  http://short.pri.org/QizxeAC